Your New Job is a Swipe Away: Job Hunting for a New Generation

Meet the smartphone apps that are transforming the way iGen job seekers and their future employers are thinking about the job search.

Looking for jobs online is not a new phenomenon. Whether you’re looking for a freelance opportunity or a full-time career, the Internet is the first place most people will look for a job. Websites such as Indeed and Monster—and yes, even Craigslist—have transformed how people think about the modern job search. But beyond the initial search, the rest of the job application process is fairly traditional. For the most part, applicants must perfect a resume and cover letter and have their three professional references ready to go.

Your New Job is a Swipe Away: Job Hunting for a New Generation

It seems as if the job search is getting yet another makeover, and this time it’s targeting the youngest job seekers: iGen, also known as Generation Z. Now, with as much ease as liking a Facebook post or “favoriting” a picture on Instagram, you can apply for a job. Apps like Jobr, Switch, Anthology and JobSnap are all offering user-friendly platforms to target young people with exceptional talent—and short attention spans... Read More »

CATEGORIES: Generations iGen / Gen Z Research Findings Technology Workplace & Leadership

The Secret to Keeping Mentally Sharp? Smartphones.

Is 60 the new 40? The prominence of smartphones, mobile devices and computer technology could be keeping Baby Boomers mentally young...

Contrary to popular belief, smartphones and other mobile technology may have the potential to improve brain functions. A new study published in the journal Intelligence found that the use of computers and mobile phones could partly explain why today’s Baby Boomers—those born between 1946 and 1964—appear to be four to eight years younger, cognitively, than a similar population less than a decade ago.

Emoji Frenzy: How iGen is Leading the New Wave of Communication

Words are disappearing from texts, e-mails and social media posts, but is this a bad thing? New insight on emoji use seems to suggest otherwise.

Communication preferences and technological advances are two major aspects that define a generation and distinguish it from its predecessors. Millennials are known for their lax way of speaking, rife with contractions, portmanteaux and “initialisms” (LOL, BTW, TTYL, etc.), which might aggravate their older colleagues, but it seems as if the next generation, iGen or Gen Z, seems to be eschewing words and letters altogether.

Emoji Frenzy: How iGen is Leading the New Wave of Communication

If you’ve sent any text messages at all in the past year, it’s extremely likely that you’ve sent or received at least one emoji. They are small digital images, icons and symbols used to express an idea or emotion in text messages and other online communications. Now it seems as if emoji have transcended mere decoration for texts and Tweets and have become a means of communication unto themselves... Read More »

CATEGORIES: Generations iGen / Gen Z Media Millennials / Gen Y Research Findings Technology

Top 5 Hits & Misses When Targeting Millennials

What companies need to know—and avoid—when making loyal customers out of Millennials

Millennials’ spending habits are changing the ways entire industries operate. Any retailer wanting to stay current and competitive with this generation needs to take notice. Millennials are an enormous generation, with unparalleled buying power, so winning them over now could mean dramatic growth immediately and in the near future.

Millennials Prefer Cash to Traditional Wedding Gifts

Millennials, who delay marriage until later in life, are discovering that they need cash more than traditional home goods.

Millennials, also known as Gen Y, have been known to buck traditions, forcing retailers, employers, and even society as a whole to adjust to their contemporary lifestyles. It should come as no surprise, then, that one of the industries Millennials are having a huge impact on is the wedding industry.

What do Millennials REALLY Think About Retirement?

Millennials are thinking about retirement—but are they taking action? A new national study reveals shocking retirement realities.

People in every generation want to retire, but whether or not they can retire often depends on when they start planning for retirement and the actions they take early on. Millennials, now the largest generation in the workforce, are currently between the ages of 20 to 37—which is a critical time to start their retirement planning and preparation—but are they even thinking about retirement?

Millennials are Leading the Smartphone Revolution in the Workplace

The benefits and downsides of widespread smartphone use at work

It is hard to deny that smartphones have taken over nearly every aspect of our lives, and the workplace is no exception. While all generations now seem to be similarly tied to their smartphone for work purposes, Millennials are the generation leading the way.

Secrets of the Social Media Generation

With their noses buried in their smartphones, what do iGen teens (the generation after Millennials) actually think about social media use?

It’s no secret that the iGen generation—also called Generation Z, born in 1995 and later—is more reliant on technology than any previous generation. Social media outlets, such as Facebook, Tumblr and Twitter allow this generation to interact with real-life friends on a different level, but social media also allows these teens to develop relationships with people they would never have originally met face to face.

Millennials Still Living at Home Despite Improved Job Market

Why do Millennials—even those with full-time jobs—continue to put off setting up independent households of their own?

Even though the economy and job market have vastly improved since the Great Recession, a record number of Millennials, also known as Gen Y, are still living with their parents. According to new research from Pew Research Center, 18–34-year-olds in the United States are actually less likely to live independently of their families than they were during the recession.

Investing in the Future: Millennials and the Stock Market

How should Millennials proceed in an uncertain market?

It’s no secret that Millennials’ spending habits are different than those of previous and even future generations. But what about their investing habits?